ASK A TRAINER: Ep. 4 – What Can I Do to See Results?

ASK A TRAINER: Ep. 4 – What Can I Do to See Results?

Ask A Trainer: Featured Question of the Week

LA Fitness Pro Results® Master Trainer, Geoff F., helps answer LA Fitness member, Sunny V.’s, question on how to start seeing results. Short and simple? You’re going to want to start increasing intensity. Find out how by watching the video below!

Do you have a fitness question? Ask one of our certified Pro Results® trainers here! Your question may be featured in an upcoming Ask Our Trainer video.**

11 + 11 =

**Selected submissions will be featured on the LA Fitness blog and possibly other LA Fitness digital media entities & websites. By making a submission, you hereby grant LA Fitness a non-exclusive, perpetual, worldwide, irrevocable license to use and make copies of the contents of such submission for any purpose and in any medium whatsoever, and you hereby waive and relinquish any copyright or other intellectual property right you may have in the contents of such submission and your right to pursue any claim for LA Fitness’s violation of those intellectual property rights.


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Vertical Training vs. Horizontal Training: Which Do You Need?

Vertical Training vs. Horizontal Training: Which Do You Need?

Whether you’re new to fitness or a seasoned vet, most likely you once experienced the feeling of walking into a gym and not knowing where to begin. With all the various cardio and weight equipment, how do you know where to start? Is it with cardio? How many days a week should you weight train? What type of training is right for your body? A lot of questions tend to flood the mind and can oftentimes scare people away from returning to the gym. Let’s break things down a bit, starting with: what is vertical training vs. horizontal training?

Vertical training can be viewed as anything that involves ascension (i.e. rising/climbing), whether actual or simulated. Examples of vertical training could be climbing on the Stairmaster, an inclined walk or run on the treadmill, or mountain climbing.

Horizontal training, on the other hand, refers to exercises that would keep your form parallel to the ground. Some typical exercises include using the rowing machine, running (without incline), or working out on a stationary bike.

Now that you know the differences– which form of training is best?

If you guessed both, you are correct. Neither is necessarily “better” for you than the other. It’s up to personal preference and which part of the body you are looking to train. Some machines may better benefit those recovering from an injury, while others training  specific skills or for a competition may want to use others. The best thing to do before questioning what type of training is right for you or getting overwhelmed by all of your options is this: come up with a clear and defined list of goals.

Knowing your goals may seem pretty obvious, but it’s a lot more than simply knowing you want to lose weight, or you want to get stronger. Break down your overall goal into smaller ones. If you want to lose weight, ask yourself where you want to lose the weight. Is it from the stomach area? Maybe you want to tone your arms? Knowing the muscles you would like to strengthen will help you narrow down which machines to use and what type of exercise you should be engaging in.

If you have your “baby goals” written down, but you’re still unsure where to begin, it’s perfectly acceptable to ask for help. More often than not, people enjoy helping others who are looking to better themselves. Making your health a priority is an admirable goal, and many share that goal. Everyone starts somewhere, so ask a friend or fellow gym-goer how to use a machine you’re unsure of. Better yet, ask an employee to help you out. If extra assistance is needed, consider signing up for personal training to get a deeper, more personalized plan for you.

Once the “scariness” of the gym goes away, you will be surprised how much easier going seems to be. Don’t be afraid to try new machines, attempt a new class or make a new friend. As author Jack Canfield once put it, “everything you want is on the other side of fear.” So, where will you begin? Is vertical training better than horizontal? In the battle between the two, both win. Train the way that best fits you, and watch all you can accomplish!


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Commit to Fit | Member Spotlights

Commit to Fit | Member Spotlights

Commit to Fit

Do you have a fitness goal? Let us know here! To learn more about Commit to fit, click here.

Goals, Commitments, Community

Commit to Fit is designed to help members stick to their fitness goals. In fact, studies show, those who write down their goals accomplish significantly more than those who do not write their goals.* Share yours with us today in the Commit to Fit form below!** You may even be featured in a future Commit to Fit post. Shown below, are some of our most recent members who have committed to their fitness goals.

Thuy T.

Thuy T. is working on maintaining her health and fitness – keep it up! You’re doing great.

Raymond C.

Raymond C. wants to increase his flexibility and continue cross-training! We believe in you Raymond!

Matt B.

Matt B. is looking to maintain his health and build lean muscle. Looking sharp – keep up the hard work!

Kellie S.

Kellie S. hopes to eventually compete. Keep your goal in mind Kellie, you can do it!


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ASK A TRAINER: Ep. 3 – What Is A Workout I Can Do Every Day to Get a Toned Body?

ASK A TRAINER: Ep. 3 – What Is A Workout I Can Do Every Day to Get a Toned Body?

Welcome to another edition of Ask A Trainer!

LA Fitness Pro Results® Master Trainer, Geoff F., answers our question of the week. Check it out below!

Do you have a fitness question? Ask one of our certified Pro Results® trainers here! Your question may be featured in an upcoming Ask Our Trainer video.**

4 + 2 =

**Selected submissions will be featured on the LA Fitness blog and possibly other LA Fitness digital media entities & websites. By making a submission, you hereby grant LA Fitness a non-exclusive, perpetual, worldwide, irrevocable license to use and make copies of the contents of such submission for any purpose and in any medium whatsoever, and you hereby waive and relinquish any copyright or other intellectual property right you may have in the contents of such submission and your right to pursue any claim for LA Fitness’s violation of those intellectual property rights.


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Is Stress Negatively Affecting Your Weight?

Is Stress Negatively Affecting Your Weight?

Stress and cortisol. They seem to go hand in hand. Why? Well, cortisol, typically known as the “stress hormone” is released when our bodies go into a state of fight-or-flight. This response can also result from physical or psychological stress. When our bodies are experiencing a stressor, our adrenal glands, located above the kidneys, discharge cortisol. Cortisol floods our bodies with glucose, giving our bodies an immediate source of energy.

That doesn’t seem too bad, does it? It’s just energy after all.

The problem is, under constant stress our bodies can start elevating cortisol levels. This results in glucose being consistently pumped throughout our bodies, which can lead to increased blood sugar levels.1 If you’ve ever found yourself wondering why you’re not losing that stubborn belly fat, your cortisol levels could be a contributing factor because “cortisol can mobilize triglycerides from storage and relocate them to visceral fat cells (those under the muscle, deep in the abdomen).”2 That stored fat hiding under muscle is what causes stubborn belly fat.

But, before giving cortisol a bad name, remember that it’s there for a reason. Proper levels of cortisol can help regulate blood pressure, assist with anti-inflammatory responses, help with blood sugar maintenance, and aid in proper glucose metabolism and proper immune function.3 All-in-all, that pesky little stress hormone on its own isn’t all that bad and other factors can play a part in stress and weight gain.

Outside factors can also play a part in weight gain. Working long hours, having a busy schedule, and rushing from one appointment to another can limit the amount of time you have to exercise, which is needed to help boost health. Aside from not exercising, if you’re stressed and always in a rush, chances are you’re opting for more fast food choices. When you’re not the one preparing your meal, you’re not in control of what’s going in it. Fast food can generally be both high in sugars and fats, so opt for at-home dining to prevent weight gain.

Helpful Ways to Combat Stress

The Mayo Clinic suggests the following strategies to help with stress management4:

  • Eating a healthy diet and getting regular exercise and plenty of sleep
  • Practicing relaxation techniques such as yoga, deep breathing, getting a massage or meditating
  • Taking time for hobbies, such as reading a book or listening to music
  • Fostering healthy friendships
  • Having a sense of humor
  • Volunteering in your community
  • Seeking professional counseling when needed

There is no secret way to live a stress-free life. Stress is simply a part of it, but it doesn’t have to be the whole of it. Learn and practice healthy ways to manage your stress, and you may notice less of a struggle with your overall health and weight. If you still feel like extra assistance is needed to help you achieve your ideal body weight or if your stress levels feel unmanageable, speak with your physician or another medical professional and see if there may be additional or alternative solutions that would work best for you.

Sources:

  1. Aronson, Dina, MS, RD. “Cortisol – Its Role in Stress, Inflammation, and Indications for Diet Therapy.” Editorial. Today’s Dietitian Nov. 2009: 38. Today’s Dietitian. Web. 29 June 2017.
  2. Ibid
  3. Elizabeth Scott, MS | Reviewed by a Board-certified Physician. “What You Need to Know About the Stress Hormone.” Verywell. N.p., n.d. Web. 29 June 2017.
  4. “Chronic Stress Puts Your Health at Risk.” Mayo Clinic. Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 21 Apr. 2016. Web. 29 June 2017.

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