Snacks to Keep You Feeling Full | Q+A

Snacks to Keep You Feeling Full | Q+A

Question:

Hello, I am a 25-year-old female who is a full-time student. I work out 3 times per week. I enjoy munching and crunching while I study, and always seem to be hungry. I was wondering what kinds of healthy snacks I can buy at the store? I must say that I have a hard time with portion control and am looking for something low in calories. I was eating a lot of nuts but seemed to gain weight with them.

– Tanya

Answer:

Frequent hunger may be a sign of either too few calories or, in your case, not enough volume. Filling the stomach triggers the vagus nerve that tells your brain you’ve eaten enough. A handful of nuts doesn’t provide the same amount of bulk that the following items do. Good low-calorie crunchy foods will fill you up better. Some examples include celery, carrots, jicama, radish, cucumber, sugar snap peas, bell pepper, apples, freeze dried fruit, air-popped popcorn, and rice cakes.  Adding a little dense energy (such as hummus, guacamole or cottage cheese) for satiety may be ideal. These combinations may provide a longer-lasting feeling of fullness.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

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This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.


 

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What Causes Low Iron Levels?

What Causes Low Iron Levels?

Iron’s Role in the Body

The main function of iron is to carry oxygen in the blood to every cell in the body.

Common Symptoms of Iron Deficiency1

  1. Pale skin
  2. Extreme exhaustion
  3. Hair loss
  4. RLS (Restless Leg Syndrome)
  5. Swollen tongue
  6. Pica – Developing a craving for “non-food substances, such as clay, dirt, or chalk.”2
  7. Frequent infections

What causes Iron Deficiency?

When your body lacks iron, it cannot produce enough of the oxygen-carrying red blood cells needed to maintain a healthy body. When the body lacks the proper amount of these cells, it can result in anemia, which can cause the body to feel tired and weary.


Iron-Rich Foods

Some iron-rich foods include, but are not limited to3:

  • Eggs, specifically egg yolks
  • Red meat
  • Poultry
  • Pork
  • Oysters
  • Mussels
  • Clams
  • Chickpeas
  • Fortified breakfast cereals
  • Pumpkin seeds
  • Soybeans
  • Black beans
  • Lentils
  • Spinach
  • Sesame seeds

The Two Types of Iron

Heme Iron – This type of iron is derived from animal sources, whereas

Non-heme Iron – Is derived from plant sources.

Proper Iron Levels

The normal hemoglobin range is generally defined as 13.5 to 17.5 grams (g) of hemoglobin per deciliter (dL) of blood for men and 12.0 to 15.5 g/dL for women. The normal ranges for children vary depending on the child’s age and gender.4

Exercise & Anemia

While some men and women who exercise at a vigorous level may be more prone to developing anemia (due to level of fitness and intensity), exercise can generally IMPROVE the distribution of red blood cells in the body and help fight off the symptoms of anemia.

Stay healthy at LA Fitness, find a club near you by clicking here.

This article is not meant to be construed as medical device. Consult with your doctor before engaging in a new fitness or nutritional regime. If you suspect you or a loved one is iron deficient, consult with your physician to discuss proper care and treatment.

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Sources:

  1. Welch, Ashley. “7 Unusual Signs of Iron Deficiency.” EverydayHealth.com, Everyday Health, 25 Oct. 2017, everydayhealth.com/news/unusual-signs-iron-deficiency/.
  2. Ibid
  3. Images, Getty, et al. “10 Healthy Foods That Are Great Sources of Iron.” EverydayHealth.com, 11 Sept. 2017, everydayhealth.com/pictures/foods-high-in-iron/.
  4. “Iron Deficiency Anemia.” Mayo Clinic, Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research, 11 Nov. 2016, mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/iron-deficiency-anemia/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20355040.

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What Causes Low Iron Levels?

Are you feeling tired and drained? It The cause may be low iron levels. Check out our article for some helpful tips on iron-rich foods.

Full, Healthy, Nutritious Meals | Q+A

Not sure where to begin when it comes to creating full, healthy & nutritious meals? Look no further! We suggest some sample meals to help get you started.

Full, Healthy, Nutritious Meals | Q+A

Full, Healthy, Nutritious Meals | Q+A

Question:

So I just started working out again. I’ve struggled with anorexia for thirteen plus years, but been in a pretty solid recovery for about two. From listening to an eating disorder about food, to having to gain mass amounts of weight in treatment, to just trying to maintain where I am…it’s been a crazy road of trying to figure out how best to treat my body with food. I have maintained a weight of about 115-117 for a while now (I’m 5’6″ and 25 years old). I guess my question is…how do I do this? What are examples of full, healthy, nutritious meals? I’m not looking to bulk up, but looking to gain strength. I suppose I’m just hoping someone can point me in the right direction. Sorry this question was all over the place, and thank you for sticking through it!

– Carly T.


Answer:

Thank you for your question, Carly! You don’t have to search far for examples of balanced meals for a healthy diet. Any meal can be adapted to your food preferences or tailored up/down in energy depending on preparation and condiments. No rules just a guideline — for lunch and dinner, start with vegetables, protein and starch as the base, plus a spoonful of fat. Add dairy or fruit as desired.

Don’t worry about portions and calories, just what looks and tastes great together! Go for seasonal produce, a variety of foods and colorful choices.

Here are some top picks for full meals:

  • Roasted chicken, potatoes and green beans.
  • Vegetable and cheese lasagna with a side salad.
  • Curried tofu and vegetables with rice.
  • Pork loin chop, mashed potato and steamed veggies.
  • Teriyaki beef stir-fry.
  • Noodles, salmon and broccoli.
  • BBQ pork, corn on the cob and coleslaw.
  • Ham and bean soup with cornbread.
  • Mango shrimp avocado tostada, add black beans.

Roasted chicken, potatoes and green beans.

Vegetable and cheese lasagna with a side salad.

 

Curried tofu and vegetables with rice.

 

Pork loin chop, mashed potato and steamed veggies.

 

Teriyaki beef stir-fry.

 

Noodles, salmon and broccoli.

 

BBQ pork, corn on the cob and coleslaw.

 

Ham and bean soup with cornbread.

Mango shrimp avocado tostada, add black beans.

Don’t worry about portions and calories, just what looks and tastes great together! Go for seasonal produce, a variety of foods and colorful choices

– Debbie J., MS, RD.

Disclaimer: This post is provided as general information only, and is not meant to be used as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. If you suspect your eating may be disordered, consult with a physician.

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AAT – Ep. 13: Strength Training or Cardio First?

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Ask A Trainer: Featured Question of the Week

New to the gym or just unsure where to begin? We speak with Pro Results® trainer Kayla V. who helps answer the age old question – does strength training or cardio come first?

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How Much Protein is Needed Per Day? | Q+A

How Much Protein is Needed Per Day? | Q+A

Question:

I’m a 180 lb. guy looking to skinny up and build muscle. Lifting a bunch lately. Running a bit. How much protein should I eat in grams per day?

– Kenneth B.

Answer:

Depending on your age and height, your estimated daily protein needs for your goals look to fall in the 90-115 gram range. That’s about 1.1-1.4 gm/kg. As you progress with regular intense training, upwards of 1.6 gm/kg (131 gms) may be needed.  Whether you lose fat or gain muscle also has to do with your total calories. If you’re undereating severely, you’ll need more protein. If your calories are beyond adequate, less protein is used for muscle development.

In addition to the amount of protein, you should focus on the quality of your protein and nutrient timing. Fatty sources of protein like sausage, cheese and regular ground beef contribute too many calories. Poultry breast, fish, loin and round cuts of beef/pork, beans and eggs are lean or medium-fat protein sources more likely to help you get thinner. Gulping down a 16 oz steak at once will not load muscles adequately. Instead, consume about 30 grams of protein per sitting, including breakfast. For supplements, a whey, casein, soy protein blend is ideal for longer-lasting protein delivery to working muscles.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

LA Fitness Living Healthy subscribe button

Want more? SUBSCRIBE to receive the latest Living Healthy articles right in your inbox!

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.


Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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