Eat These Eight Fall Foods to Help Fight Weight Gain

Eat These Eight Fall Foods to Help Fight Weight Gain

Eat These Eight Fall Foods to Help Fight Weight Gain

Enjoy these wonderful and festive foods for your healthier meal choices this season!

Seasonal Options

The holidays are approaching fast, which means it is the time of year for delicious and healthy seasonal fruits, vegetables and many more selections! Loaded with nutrients, these autumn harvest fruits and vegetables fill you up with few calories and lots of fiber to help you stay satisfied longer and displace higher-calorie foods so you eat less. Goodbye pumpkin muffins and muffin-tops, hello fresh fall produce and preventing weight gain.

Beets

These purple root vegetables are a good source of fiber (soluble pectin), folate, manganese, potassium, and phenols. Not a gourmet chef? Use a julienne tool or coarse grater to slice raw beets into match sticks that you can toss in a simple salad or use for crunch in a BBQ sandwich instead of coleslaw. It’s easy to roast a beet like a baked potato – wrap in foil and cook in a 400oF oven for an hour. After cooling for 10 minutes, peel and serve sliced with dill or thyme.

Brussels Sprouts

Grab these especially if they are on the stalk or on sale. They provide Vitamins B6, C and K, and Folate. Try Brussels sprouts cut in half, tossed in olive oil and sprinkled with salt, then baked in the oven at 375°F for 20 minutes. If ‘cooking’ isn’t your thing, try microwave steaming some frozen Brussels sprouts, then sprinkle them with lemon juice, parmesan cheese and chopped walnuts.

Butternut Squash

Typically seen in a cornucopia, these squash have an abundance of nutrients found in the golden flesh, including Vitamins A, B6, and C and carotenoids, which give the squash its bright yellow color!

Quickly cook scooped out halves in the microwave in less than 10 minutes! The meat of the squash is an exceptional addition to a curry dish, or you can try eating by itself with brown sugar and nutmeg.  For all of the Epicureans out there, you might favor a butternut squash soup.

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Cranberries

These tart berries are a good source of Vitamin C and enzymes, plus anti-inflammatory anthocyanins, which provide the cranberries with their red tint.

Jellied and dried cranberries are not your only options; a raw cranberry relish avoids even turning on the stove! Toss a cup of cranberries with a cut-up small, seedless orange with rind and a peeled, cut up tart green apple. Place the cranberries, orange and apple into a food processor until finely diced, then add ½ to 1 cup sugar and let sit overnight in the refrigerator. Use instead of gravy to accompany pork or poultry.

Figs

About four medium fresh or dried figs provide excellent fiber, a good amount of Vitamin B6 and potassium, and some magnesium. Figs also include polyphenol antioxidants, which are some of the most abundant antioxidants in a healthy diet.

You don’t have to be a cooking aficionado to include figs in a meal or snack. Try slicing a few fresh figs to top a pizza made with whole wheat crust (brushed with olive oil and garlic), caramelized or red onion, goat cheese, prosciutto and arugula before baking. For a quick snack, chop dried figs and add to a nut mix.

Mushrooms

These unassuming fungi boast a good amount of Riboflavin, Vitamin D, and minerals, plus the antioxidant ergothioneine.

Foodies may delight in homemade stuffed mushrooms; however even a novice can add sautéed mushrooms to any pasta, green beans, or rice pilaf to bring out an earthy flavor. Use sliced raw white or crimini (baby portabella) mushrooms to top a salad or homemade flatbread.

 

Pomegranate

The arils of this fruit provide significant Fiber, Vitamins C and K, plus antioxidant polyphenols. After opening a pomegranate and removing the juicy arils, they can be eaten by themselves as a snack or used as an addition to salads, salsa and smoothies. The season is short in the US – just a few months – so grab these while you can!

Swiss Chard

These greens with a red stem are high in Vitamins A, C, E and K, magnesium, potassium, iron and the phytonutrient betalain. Chopped leaves can be sautéed with oil and garlic, then drizzled with lemon juice or balsamic vinegar and sprinkled with a pinch of crushed red pepper flakes for a kick.  To use them raw, remove the spines, chop the leaves and add to a mild salad of cranberries, sliced almonds, crumbled feta and avocado, plus a vinaigrette of your choice.

Bonus! Bean soup

This fall favorite made from any number of legumes usually combined with broth, carrots, onion and celery can stand alone as an entrée and provides ample fiber and protein with multiple minerals to boot. Combine with diced ham for a heartier meal.

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How Does Working Out Correlate with Blood Sugar Management? | Diabetes

How Does Working Out Correlate with Blood Sugar Management? | Diabetes

Diabetes 101

How Does Working Out Correlate With Blood Sugar Management? | Diabetes

November is American Diabetes Month! Learn more about it below.

Around the World

Did you know?  Around 1.4 million people in the U.S. are diagnosed with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes each year. There are more than 29 million Americans living with diabetes and another 86 million with pre-diabetes.1

November is American Diabetes Month, and people around the country are putting in countless efforts to help raise money for, bring awareness to and ultimately find a cure for diabetes.

Type 1 Diabetes

Typically diagnosed in children, type 1 diabetes is a chronic disease in which the body does not produce insulin. According to the American Diabetes Association, “the body breaks down the sugars and starches you eat into a simple sugar called glucose, which it uses for energy. Insulin is a hormone that the body needs to get glucose from the bloodstream into the cells of the body.”2

It is safe to say that insulin is a very vital part of our body’s functionality. Since the body is not producing insulin, type 1 diabetics have to somehow get insulin into their bodies. This is done by either an insulin pump, which is a portable device that directly pumps insulin into the body, or by injection. With technology advancing there are new and innovative ways to give the body insulin. To find out more about insulin intake visit the health.com insulin article here.

Type 2 Diabetes

When people have type 2 diabetes, their body does not use insulin correctly, which is also known as insulin resistance. At first, their pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it, but over time the pancreas isn’t able to keep up and can’t make enough insulin to keep the blood glucose levels normal.3

Luckily many type 2 diabetics can manage the disease with proper diet and exercise. But in some other cases, type 2 diabetics have to rely on taking insulin later in life due to the pancreas not being able to produce enough insulin.4

Both types can take a serious toll on the human body. This is why it is especially important for diabetics to take care of their overall health, which includes working out. So how does working out affect those with diabetes?

Blood Sugar Management

Since both type 1 and type 2 diabetes affect the body’s insulin levels, blood sugar management is important to watch and keep track of.

Studies show that exercise speeds up the metabolism in some diabetic cases, which helps keep blood sugar in control.5

For example, if you have type 1 diabetes and have high blood sugar levels, working out may help lower your blood sugar levels naturally. But it is important for type one diabetics to watch their levels because working out could make their blood sugar levels too low. A good blood sugar level is from 80 to 120, typically any higher or lower may have an effect on overall body function.6

Many type 1 and type 2 diabetics carry some sort of snack with them to help manage their levels. Plus, type 1 diabetics typically have insulin on hand for blood sugar management purposes.

Regular Exercise + Blood Sugar Levels

If you have type 2 diabetes or are pre-diabetic, regular exercise may help reduce your body’s glucose levels, which can help make your symptoms less severe.With type 1 diabetics, a regular workout routine can help with overall health and blood sugar levels. But remember, if blood sugar levels are too high or too low before your workout, it is advised to wait until the levels get to normal before you start. Ways to get blood sugar levels normal vary, as some diabetics can grab a quick snack whereas others would need to adjust his/her insulin.

Good for Everyone

Working out is a great routine for anyone to get into, but for diabetics it is especially important due to the side effects of the disease. The month of November recognizes and brings awareness to diabetes and we are happy to provide a place for those who want/need to live a healthy lifestyle at LA Fitness.

If you know someone who has diabetes or if you have it yourself, let us know how exercise has helped you in your diabetic journey. For more information on the basics of diabetes from the American Diabetes Association please click here.

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

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References

  1. Association, A. D. (1995). Statistics about diabetes. Retrieved November 2, 2016, from http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/statistics/
  2. Association, A. D. (1995). Type 1 diabetes. Retrieved November 2, 2016, from http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-1/?loc=db-slabnav
  3. Association, A. D. (1995). Type 2 diabetes. Retrieved November 2, 2016, from http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-2/?referrer=https://www.google.com/
  4. Center, J. D. (2016, October 28). The truth about insulin and type 2 diabetes. Retrieved November 2, 2016, from http://www.joslin.org/info/the_truth_about_insulin_and_type_2_diabetes.html
  5. Association, A. D. (1995). Fitness. Retrieved October 24, 2016, from http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/?referrer=https://www.google.com/
  6. Association, A. D. (1995). Checking your blood glucose (blood sugar): American diabetes Association®. Retrieved November 2, 2016, from http://www.diabetes.org/living-with-diabetes/treatment-and-care/blood-glucose-control/checking-your-blood-glucose.html
  7. Association, A. D. (1995). Physical activity is important. Retrieved October 24, 2016, from http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/physical-activity-is-important.html

 

 

 

What’s the Best Way to Eat Healthy With Little Prep Work?

What’s the Best Way to Eat Healthy With Little Prep Work?

Question:

Do you recommend any meal replacement shakes, like invigor8?  How about any home meal delivery services?  I’m trying to reduce shopping time and prepping time since I work 11 hours a day and have an 11 month old.

-Angie A. 

 

Answer:

Meal replacement shakes work great as an emergency backup for on-the-go or last minute meal alternatives. Look for ones with 10-15 grams protein, 5-10 grams fat, and 20-30 grams carbohydrate (no more than half sugar) that provide at least 200 calories. Plan on a snack such as peanut butter and celery for more fiber and solids to keep you full longer.

shake

Home meal delivery services are a wonder for those that can afford them.  Most have a heart-healthy or calorie-controlled option. Perhaps a dinner-only delivery twice a week in the ‘family’ quantity will guarantee enough leftovers to reheat so that you’d only need to worry about weekend dinners. For quick lunches, a cold vegetable/pasta/protein dish from the service deli counter at your grocer might fit the bill. Consider, too, utilizing frozen skillet meals for two that can be enhanced with fresh ingredients on hand — only one pan to clean!

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

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Ask our Dietitian

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Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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Fall into Savings on New LA Fitness Gear

Fall into Savings on New LA Fitness Gear

Breathe in, relax and find the perfect fall gear for your workouts this season! We have fall-worthy discounts at shoplafitness.com on all of your favorite LA Fitness workout attire. Now through November 30th, save 15% on all LA Fitness gear.  Find the perfect hat, sweatshirt, shorts and much more at shoplafitness.com, and save today!

How do you use the 15% off code? Just follow these quick and easy steps:

  • Go to shoplafitness.com
  • Pick out your favorite item(s)
  • Select how many of each item you want
  • Click on “Bag it Now”
  • Follow the steps regarding postal services
  • Type in the discount code “FALL” and head straight to the checkout menu

It really is that easy!  Remember to use code: FALL to save your 15% through November 30th.

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Do I Need to Change My Diet for the Next Phase of Physical Fitness?

Do I Need to Change My Diet for the Next Phase of Physical Fitness?

Question:

I have been a member since May of this year and love the facility in Florence, KY. Over all I have went from 319 to 235 with about 50 lbs lost at LA. I am basically at my goal weight and have begun to lift using free weights and the hoist and hammer equipment. I noticed an immediate change in muscle but then leveled off. I am researching my diet as it is still more geared to weight loss. I am 6’4” male, I have been on a high protein very low carb diet about 2000-2400 cals. I am looking to keep my caloric intake about the same but switch to about 150g of carbs a day 200-230g of protein and 60-70 grams of fat.

What is your opinion on this plan? Thanks for any help. I lift 3-4 days a week for an hour usually followed by 20-30 minutes of cardio on the elliptical or treadmill, I try to do 10 minute miles with a heart rate of 140-150 if that matters. I have also read I should lift and do light cardio and then rest for 48 hours at least on the weights and do more intense cardio on non lifting days.

-Robert M. 

Answer:

Hi Robert – Good to hear of your success at your local LA Fitness club! The plan you describe would provide about 30% carbohydrate, 39% protein at 1.9 gm/kg, and 31% fat in 2030 calories (at lowest protein and highest fat given). This seems a suitable transition from your previous diet.

I am having success losing weight, but could you review my strategy to see if it is my best option?

Since you are more active than you were 5 months ago, you may need more carbohydrates to retain your muscle mass, but can add these in the future. For maximum benefit from the carbs you are eating, shoot for 25 grams of fiber per day. The produce, grains and beans needed to provide that amount won’t leave room for refined sugars anyway. You don’t need more than 200 grams protein daily as that’s about the maximum which is utilized by muscle, while the remainder would be burned for fuel (which is carbohydrate’s job). The amount of fat is ideal for now but could be slightly increased if you end up needing more energy – as long as it’s mostly from unsaturated plant sources.

Keep up the good work!

– Debbie J., MS, RD

 

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Suggested Articles

Ask our Dietitian

QA_icon

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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