Apple Cider Vinegar and Body Fat

Apple Cider Vinegar and Body Fat

Question:

 I’d like to know if using Apple Cider Vinegar an hour before eating does indeed burn stored body fat. And also, does the body acclimate to this after a period of time, so would NOT taking it for a week or so make it effective again?

– Michelle

Answer:

The answer is that perhaps apple cider vinegar (ACV) may help in human weight loss, but it is not proven as effective. Several small studies (mostly on animals) point to some success but they don’t make a body of evidence to say that weight loss from taking ACV is research-backed. The specific timing you mentioned is supported for insulin sensitivity, not weight loss.

Please read our previous article on ACV here: Apple Cider Vinegar – Hype or Helpful?

Almost ALL reports of apple cider vinegar and weight loss are anecdotal and inflated. Of note, one Japanese study of 155 obese individuals taking a tablespoon or ½ ounce ACV (diluted) twice a day resulted in a modest 4-pound average loss over 3 months. *  It may be the acetic acid in apple cider vinegar that boosts fat metabolism in addition to suppressing appetite. All vinegars contain acetic acid and would have similar effects. Look at healthy Mediterranean-style food patterns with their higher intakes of balsamic and red wine vinegars.

As to the concept of acclimating to daily ingestion of ACV, I could not find anything in the scientific literature that indicates such specifically. Although it’s said one can refrain from caffeine for a month to reduce tolerance, I’m not sure the same would apply to vinegar.

* Vinegar Intake Reduces Body Weight, Body Fat Mass, and Serum Triglyceride Levels in Obese Japanese Subjects. Kondo T, Kishi M, Fushimi T, Ugajin S, Kaga T. Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry 2009 (73) 8; 1837-1843

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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Healthy Protein and Veggie Combinations

Healthy Protein and Veggie Combinations

Question:

 Hi. I am trying to lose weight. Could you please give me examples of 4 ounces of protein and 1 ounce of green vegetables? Grilled chicken and broccoli every day isn’t appealing long term. Also, what would some snacks with 15 grams of protein be? Thanks.

– Mike S.

Answer:

Here are some examples per your request:

Protein equivalent to 4 oz meat/poultry Green Vegetable   Snacks
1 can of chili beans + 1 oz. cheese peppers (+onion, tomato) ½ C. hummus, crudités, pita chips
2 eggs + 4 whites spinach (+mushroom) ½ C. cottage cheese (+pineapple)
8 oz. plain Greek yogurt cucumber salad (+onion, tomato) 2 Tbsp. peanut butter, celery, raisins
salmon or halibut asparagus (+garlic) 1.5 oz. jerky (+watermelon)
ahi tuna mixed salad greens (+avocado) ½ C. tuna salad (+crackers)
pork tenderloin green beans (+red pepper) 1.5 oz. [50 gm] zone-type bar
beef eye of round zucchini (+ cherry tomato) 2 oz. [1/2 C.] almonds (+apple)
chicken breast kale slaw (+cabbage, carrot) small bean & cheese burrito
turkey breast Brussel sprouts hard cooked egg + 3 C. popcorn

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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Getting Rid of “Uh-oh!” When You Go

Getting Rid of “Uh-oh!” When You Go

Question:

How do I get rid of runny stools?

– Bjorn

Answer:

What goes in must come out, so I consider what happens in the bathroom open for discussion here. If you suffer from persistent runny stool, there may be an underlying physical cause or infection and you should first consult a physician*. Aside from medication side effects, if your bowel movements are loose on occasion it could be stress or something you’re eating that ‘disagrees’ with you.

The gut can be affected by not only emotional stress or anxiety, but physical stress as well. (e.g., endurance runners often have colitis, resulting in bathroom issues when they run). A diet change or introduction of new/unusual foods, particularly spicy ones, may prompt your GI system to partially reject what it’s unfamiliar with. Another possibility is that you may have a reduced tolerance for lactose, fructose, gluten or sugar alcohols.

Here are some tips to deal with runny poop:

  • Stay hydrated
  • Eat slowly
  • Chew thoroughly                            
  • Eat smaller portions
  • Slowly increase soluble fiber intake (potatoes, beans, instant oats, figs) Soluble fiber helps to bind water and form soft, bulky stools.

To help determine if particular foods may be bothering you:

  • Try going a week avoiding your most likely trigger: alcohol, caffeine, greasy foods, diet drinks, dairy products, gluten sources, apple/peaches/pears or spicy foods.
  • Keep a food journal of everything else you are eating and whether you have loose stools.
  • If symptoms resolve, then incorporate the item back into your diet before moving on to eliminating the next one.

*See a medical doctor if you have chronic diarrhea, defined by 3 or more watery stools per day lasting 4 weeks or more, or if you’ve lost weight unintentionally as you may be at risk for dehydration or malabsorption.

References:

  1. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/diarrhea
  2. WebMD https://www.webmd.com/digestive-disorders/chronic-diarrhea-16/default.htm

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

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Which Salt is Best – Himalayan Pink, Celtic Sea, Iodized?

Which Salt is Best – Himalayan Pink, Celtic Sea, Iodized?

Question:

Hi! I have read various articles about healthy salt. Some say Himalayan Pink Salt and another article talks about Celtic sea salt. I know it’s important to get iodine in our diet. Which salt is best?

– Mary F.

Answer:

Besides the sodium-chloride compound we know as the base of our table salt, natural salts of the earth contain other elements and possibly some contaminants. In the case of Himalayan pink salt which is harvested from mountains in Pakistan and sun-dried, the mineral content varies by mine since the salt range is so expansive. Iron oxide is evident in the characteristic pink color, while potassium, magnesium and calcium are imperceptible. The content of these trace minerals is so low that it would take cups, if not pounds, of Himalayan salt to make a nutritional impact.

Similar to sea salt procured elsewhere around the globe, Celtic sea salt harvested in seaside fields contains minerals, sediment, and algae that affect its color and taste. It is sun-dried in solar evaporation ponds and contains small amounts of magnesium, potassium, calcium, and to a lesser extent, iodine. Contaminants like microplastics and heavy metals are possible, as there is global ocean pollution and open water circulates.

Granulated table salt is refined to remove such impurities, but other trace minerals are lost and chemical traces remain. Ferrocyanide, talc, and silica aluminate are commonly included in its processing. The addition of potassium-iodide to salt in the United States began as a public strategy for treating goiter and continued as a prevention, much like our fortification of folate in cereals for neural tube defects during pregnancy. About 70% of the table salts sold in the US are iodized and contain additional stabilizers.

Other notable food-grade salts include Kosher salt coarse grains usually processed without iodine, fleur del sel flakes collected from the top of seawater salt ponds, sel gris salt crystals from the bottom of those evaporated ponds, rock salt mined through brining, and those mixed with earthen compounds (such as kala namak, Hawaiian ‘alaea’, and black lava salt).

The best salt for you depends on your concern. If you need to limit sodium intake but want to use a naturally sourced salt, then consider a coarse or “rough” granule of any raw type as there is less packing of salt crystals in a measured volume. If your concern is getting enough iodine, then you can choose a Celtic sea salt and eat sea vegetables, potatoes, cranberries, strawberries, yogurt, navy beans, eggs and salmon for additional iodine.

Of course, if you rarely salt your food or only use small amounts like ¼ teaspoon in baking, the health difference is probably negligible and iodized table salt will work.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

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Which Rice is Most Nutritious?

Which Rice is Most Nutritious?

Question:

Which rice do you think is the best for all around nutrition, whether you are trying to gain mass or lose weight?

– Allen C.

Answer:

A particular food’s nutritional value can be interpreted many ways. What you consider to be most nutritious might be the most nutrient dense, highest calorie or healthiest (preventing disease) food. With respect to your question regarding weight change, a single food item plays a small part in an overall varied diet.

See our answer to a similar question last year: Brown Rice vs. White Rice – Which is Healthier? | Q+A

There are nearly 40,000 varieties of rice! My top picks for packing a nutrition punch are wild rice, brown rice, red rice and black rice. Their nutrient and phytochemical content varies as does their speed/completeness of digestion. Method of preparation can affect the starch breakdown and glycemic index, which play a role in satiety and therefore caloric intake. The less processed the better – I’d take fresh cooked white rice over a can of wild rice soup any day. Organically grown rice is less likely to have arsenic and would, therefore, be healthier, though it won’t affect weight directly.

Keep in mind the likelihood of cooking & incorporating these rice types into your preferred dishes and your willingness to try new recipes. If you don’t end up eating it, there is zero nutrition.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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