15 Meatless Monday Recipes

15 Meatless Monday Recipes

Question:

I just started participating in no-meat-Mondays. What are some well-balanced vegetarian based meals I can eat (breakfast, lunch, dinner)?

Answer:

What a fun step toward a healthy-for-you and better-for-the-planet diet!

Here is a month’s worth of options for your Meatless Mondays:

Breakfast

  • Whole wheat pancakes with nut butter and banana. Pea milk.
  • Avocado toast with cucumber and basil. Pineapple. Soy milk.
  • Bean burrito with salsa. Orange. Almond milk.
  • Tofu scramble with spinach, mushroom and red pepper. Peach. Coconut milk.
  • Oatmeal, nut and dried fruit porridge. Rice milk.

Lunch

  • Pasta salad with peas, pine nuts, and tomato. Apple.
  • Wild rice soup with mushrooms and carrot. Roasted chickpeas. Plum.
  • No-meat bean chili with cornbread muffin. Melon.
  • Tofu coconut curry with cabbage, carrot, and peppers. Kiwi.
  • Gnocchi with pesto. Spinach salad w/ sliced almonds and berries.

Dinner

  • Twice baked potatoes with vegan cheese. Broccoli.
  • Black bean fajitas with onion and bell pepper. Whole wheat tortilla.
  • Hoisin tofu lettuce wraps with carrot and green onion. Ramen noodles.
  • Roasted vegetable thin crust pizza with vegan cheese.
  • Butternut squash and apple bake (or puree for soup). Pumpkin seeds. Kale chips.

Choices inspired by PETA vegan recipes.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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Question:

Are protein supplements necessary if you already consume a lot of protein naturally?

Answer:

Supplements are intended to fill the gaps missing from dietary intake, whether from food choices or impaired digestion/absorption. If your protein consumption is already high (> 1 gm/kg per body weight) then protein supplements are generally unnecessary. Many people still choose to include supplements instead of real food due to time, cooking or refrigeration restraints. The protein in certain supplements may be concentrated or isolated, but most supplemental protein is part of a bar or meal replacement shake with significant carbohydrates, fat or other nutrients. Consider the whole product when choosing a protein supplement.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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Warm Comfort Foods Made Healthy(ish)

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When temperatures drop, it’s time to put on cozy slippers and pull up a blanket. A soothing plate to warm your belly doesn’t hurt… unless it’s unhealthy. Most comfort foods we turn to are heavily laden with fat, starch and calories. There are healthier ways to enjoy down-home classics by making a few tweaks. Try the following updates to your traditional favorites without leaving flavor behind.

Meatloaf and mashed potatoes. This duo based on simple protein and starch can be loaded with saturated fat.

Meatloaf

  • Substitute 4 or 7% fat ground beef for regular.
  • Use whole wheat bread crumbs to increase the fiber.
  • Increase the diced onion, garlic or other vegetables.
  • Skip the egg yolks and “substitute two egg whites for every whole egg to help the loaf stay together,” suggests Emily McKenna Kennedy of EatingWell Magazine.1

Mashed potatoes

  • Leave skins on potatoes for fiber that helps with satiety.
  • Decrease the dairy fat by using light sour cream, fat-free milk and less butter.
  • Add zest with extra roasted garlic, paprika and fresh herbs instead of salt.
  • Options: moisten with reduced-sodium chicken broth; sneak in mashed cooked cauliflower; whip potatoes for creamy texture.

Pasta casseroles (e.g. baked macaroni & cheese, lasagna) While tasty now, the cheese and white flour noodles may depress your mood later after you get on the scale.

    • Increase vegetables by adding chopped cauliflower to mac ‘n cheese and sliced zucchini in lasagna.
  • Use lower-fat cheese (part-skim ricotta and reduced fat mozzarella) but concentrate flavor by adding an ounce of hard dry cheese such as Parmesan or pecorino.
  • To curb the need for salt consider a sprinkle of crushed red pepper for bite.

Chicken pot pie / Shepherd’s Pie  It’s not just what’s under the cover that adds up here. With a thick crust or mashed potato layer, you can also blame the topping.

  • Replace cream with a blend of low-fat milk, white wine and olive oil for the pot pie sauce.
  • Use vegetable broth, olive oil and tomato paste for the shepherd’s pie sauce.
  • Double up on the diced vegetables for more volume with little calories.
  • Go crustless on the bottom by using an oven-safe skillet or nonstick casserole dish.

Biscuits and Gravy – This Southern breakfast that sticks to your ribs is traditionally full of saturated fat and calories.

Biscuits:

  • Using fat-free buttermilk and less butter, Cooking Light offers a recipe for low-fat biscuits (3 gm fat each).2 We suggest omitting the honey for this savory dish.
  • Keep biscuits small (under 2”diameter) and serve only ½ C. gravy per 2 biscuits.

Gravy:

  • Substitute turkey breakfast sausage (or mushrooms for vegetarian) for pork sausage.
  • Use skim milk in the gravy and stir regularly until thickened.
  • Add extra herbs like fennel and sage for flavor when reducing salt.

Warm Apple Pie – Here is a double whammy! The crust is full of fat and the filling is full of sugar.

  • Gear up the ratio of solid fruit to the rest of ingredients.
  • Use fresh cooked apples instead of canned pie filling.
  • Make a lattice work or crumble topping instead of a full crust top. “Less crust on your pie = fewer calories from crust,” says Registered Dietitian Jessica Cording. 3
  • Optional: top with a dollop of vanilla frozen yogurt instead of a scoop of ice cream.

Loaded Cheesy Potato Soup  A thick chowder or bisque base isn’t the only culprit when the garnish can weigh in at a hefty hundred calories or so.

  • Substitute reduced fat sour cream for regular.
  • Try adding pureed cooked cauliflower to up the vegetable content.
  • Top with only an ounce of hard dry cheese or extra sharp cheddar for punch.
  • Top with just a sprinkle of fat-removed center cut bacon and plenty of green onion/chives.

Now you can take solace in knowing there’s a way to enjoy comfort foods without ruining your physique. Pick the changes you’d like to try, have a go at them in the kitchen and let us know your favorite updates in the comments section below!

Sources:

  1. Emily McKenna Kennedy, “How to Make Meatloaf Healthier,” EatingWell. http://www.eatingwell.com/article/56415/how-to-make-meatloaf-healthier/ Accessed Oct. 1, 2018.
  2. Maureen Callahan, “Flaky Buttermilk Biscuits,” Cooking Light. Nov. 2008. https://www.myrecipes.com/recipe/flaky-buttermilk-biscuits Accessed Oct. 22, 2018.
  3. Jessica Cording, “Brilliant Baking Hacks That Make Your Apple Pie Healthier,” Shape. 2017. https://www.shape.com/healthy-eating/cooking-ideas/healthy-apple-pie-hacks Accessed Oct. 22, 2018.

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Understanding Nutrition for Weight Loss Success

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Question:

What should start with if I want to learn with nutrition? My focus would be weight loss.

– Ricardo E.

Answer:

We already have a primer for you! Our previous post Let’s Talk About the Basics: Carbs, Fats & Proteins includes the nutrients that contain calories. Nutrients are components of food that are vital for life. Water is the fourth major nutrient, but it has no calories. These parts of food are called “macronutrients,” while vitamins and minerals are called “micronutrients.”

What do Macro and Micronutrients Have to do with Weight Loss?

The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics* has a simple 3-step message for weight loss: 1) Make smart choices from every food group; 2) Get the most nutrition from your diet; and 3) Balance food and physical activity. These are the key nutrition principles applied within almost every weight loss plan.

To learn more about nutrition, of course, you can read through our Living Healthy blog archives! For more in-depth learning consider a mass open online course (MOOC). Several are free (taken as an audit, not for credit) and available from trusted sources like respected U.S. universities.

Source:

Back to Basics for Healthy Weight Loss, The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Oct. 18. 2018. Accessed 11.26.2018.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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