AAT: Ep. 36 – How Do I Prioritize Losing Weight and Gaining Muscle

AAT: Ep. 36 – How Do I Prioritize Losing Weight and Gaining Muscle

Ask A Trainer: Featured Question of the Week

On this episode of ‘Ask A Trainer’ we speak with LA Fitness Pro Results® trainer Morgan C., and get her expert advice on whether or not strength training or cardio should come first when it comes to weight loss. 


Do you have a fitness question? Ask one of our certified Pro Results® trainers here! Your question may be featured in an upcoming Ask Our Trainer video.**

13 + 13 =

**Selected submissions will be featured on the LA Fitness blog and possibly other LA Fitness digital media entities & websites. By making a submission, you hereby grant LA Fitness a non-exclusive, perpetual, worldwide, irrevocable license to use and make copies of the contents of such submission for any purpose and in any medium whatsoever, and you hereby waive and relinquish any copyright or other intellectual property right you may have in the contents of such submission and your right to pursue any claim for LA Fitness’s violation of those intellectual property rights.


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HIIT Results in Weight Loss

HIIT Results in Weight Loss

Watch out because we’re about to HIIT you with some facts (that’s the only pun, I swear).

HIIT, otherwise known as high-intensity interval training, is a fast yet challenging way to get your workout in and continue burning calories afterward your workout as well. This is due to the Afterburn Effect” caused by EPOC, or post-exercise oxygen consumption. EPOC can help HIIT enthusiasts burn calories for up to 36 hrs. after their workout!*

Shorter workout periods and longer calorie-burning times? It sounds too good to be true.

(But it’s not.)

HIIT incorporates functional exercises, core training, cardio interval training, and strength training. The key is focusing on different heart rate training zones. Each zone uses a different percentage of max heart rate, allowing for different types of burns. While there are different types of HIIT workouts ranging from 10 minutes, all the way to an hour, HIIT by LAF uses the full hour so you get the best workout to help maximize your endurance, calorie burn, and fat loss.

In order to achieve the “Afterburn Effect”, you should maintain staying within 80% to 89% of your max heart rate for 15-25 minutes throughout your workout. This is when carbohydrates and fats go through supply variances and help contribute to the burn. Due to HIIT being based around heart rate, a heart rate monitor is suggested in order to properly monitor your workout.

In a HIIT by LAF class, MYZONE Heart Rate monitors are worn. MYZONE uses the HUNT formula to calculate max HR.

HUNT Formula

Max HR = 211 – (0.64 x age)

For example, a 28-year-old female would calculate her max HR like this –

Step 1: Multiple 0.64 x 28 (person’s age), which equals 17.92.

Step 2: Subtract that number (17.92) from 211, which equals a maximum heart rate of 193.08.

0.64 x 28 = 17.92

211 – 17.92 = 193.08

HIIT and Weight Loss

The whole purpose of interval training is to help increase calorie burn and build more lean muscle mass. With HIIT, the body may be burning through more calories than it’s used to, depending on your old routine. Because of this, it’s super important that you’re giving your body the nutrition it needs in order to sustain a high-intensity workout – and that means plenty of protein.

Check out our list of protein suggestions you may want to add to your diet!

Try HIIT by LAF

Thinking about giving HIIT by LAF a try? Find out more by checking out some FAQs here.

The Living Healthy Podcast recently published an episode that dives further into what HIIT training encompasses, who HIIT training benefits the most, and why it may be worth adding to your exercise routine. LA Fitness Master Trainer, Geoff F., is our expert on the matter. Listen to the full episode, here.

Visit one of the following LA Fitness locations and try out a HIIT by LAF class today!*

Illinois

Tinley Park (Signature Club)

Coming Soon!

Arizona

PHOENIX BELL RD, AZ

California

AGOURA HILLS (SIG), CA
NORWALK IMPERIAL HWY, CA
MISSION VIEJO – ALICIA PKWY, CA
SANTA ANA – 17TH STREET, CA

Texas

DALLAS MOCKINGBIRD @ LEMON (DALLAS), TX
FRISCO MARKETPLACE/ PARKWAY (DALLAS), TX
MCKINNEY CUSTER (DALLAS), TX
SACHSE (DALLAS), TX
SPRING-KUYKENDAHL (SIG), TX

Canada

NORTH YORK-YONGE ST (SIG), ONT

*Results may vary. HIIT by LAF is available to LA Fitness members 16 years of age or older (or at least 13 years of age and accompanied by a parent or legal guardian) who have purchased Spectrum-branded programming, as indicated on such members’ membership agreements. A parent or legal guardian must sign membership agreement on behalf of members under 18 years of age. Non-LA Fitness members must provide valid I.D. and sign a waiver of liability to use HIIT by LAF studios. Please visit a HIIT by LAF studio for more information, including membership options and pricing.


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What’s Up with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness?

What’s Up with Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness?

Why do muscles sometimes hurt right away and other times up to 48 hours afterward? Delayed Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS) is something every gym goer experiences, but it can affect everyone differently. DOMS is a common result of physical strain put on the muscles and the microscopic tears, or damage, done to the muscle fibers. This “damage” done to the muscles is extremely beneficial in helping with muscle growth and building strength, but it can cause some discomfort.

While no one likes to be in pain, the slight aches are a good indication that your body is benefiting from the new workout routine. When your body adjusts to the exercise, you’ll experience less pain, but this may be a sign it’s time to switch to a new exercise routine in order to keep your muscles guessing and not getting used to doing the same movements. A shock to the system will help increase muscle awareness and help contribute to continued muscle growth.

Minor discomfort is considered normal, but if your aches and pains are preventing you from doing everyday tasks, this could be an indicator that you’ve strained a muscle too far. In that case, focus on another muscle group in order to give your sore muscles enough time to heal. A good way to help prevent muscle soreness (or at least minimize it) is to properly stretch after each workout session. Some articles on the benefits of stretching can be found here and here.

Additional ways to help the body recover from DOMS is ice, rest, pain medication, massage, heat, and of course, stretching.1 Some people may even benefit from a post-workout cooldown, which would be about 10 minutes of light cardio, followed by stretching. This works because “when muscle temperature is increased, blood flow increases, bringing fresh oxygen and healing nutrients to the injured site.”2 It’s also important that you switch up the muscle groups you’re targeting at the gym, in order to build overall muscle and avoid over trained muscles. This is where injury can occur.

What if you don’t experience soreness after a workout? Well, that doesn’t necessarily mean that you’re not working out hard enough. Different body types handle pain and exercise differently. It could just mean that you’re one of the lucky ones not experiencing as much inflammation as others might. Another way to help decrease DOMS is staying properly hydrated.3 Drinking enough water helps prevent dehydration and assists with circulation.

What are your tips for helping combat DOMS? Leave your suggestions in the comments below. 

Sources:

  1. Sarnataro, Barbara Russi. “Sore Muscles? Don’t Stop Exercising.” WebMD, WebMD, www.webmd.com/fitness-exercise/features/sore-muscles-dont-stop-exercising.
  2. Ibid
  3. Zickl, Danielle. “Is Muscle Soreness Really a Sign Of an Effective Workout?” Men’s Health, Men’s Health, 30 July 2018, www.menshealth.com/fitness/a19542200/what-is-delayed-onset-muscle-soreness/.

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AAT: Ep. 35 – Workouts for Strengthening the Back

AAT: Ep. 35 – Workouts for Strengthening the Back

Ask A Trainer: Featured Question of the Week

On this episode of ‘Ask A Trainer’ we speak with LA Fitness Pro Results® trainer Morgan C., and get her expert advice on which exercises help strengthen the back. 


Do you have a fitness question? Ask one of our certified Pro Results® trainers here! Your question may be featured in an upcoming Ask Our Trainer video.**

9 + 6 =

**Selected submissions will be featured on the LA Fitness blog and possibly other LA Fitness digital media entities & websites. By making a submission, you hereby grant LA Fitness a non-exclusive, perpetual, worldwide, irrevocable license to use and make copies of the contents of such submission for any purpose and in any medium whatsoever, and you hereby waive and relinquish any copyright or other intellectual property right you may have in the contents of such submission and your right to pursue any claim for LA Fitness’s violation of those intellectual property rights.


Recommended 'Ask A Trainer' Videos

Does the Body Burn More Calories in the Cold?

Does the Body Burn More Calories in the Cold?

Winter is here, and red noses are aplenty. Big coats shield us from the icy cold, and boots work their hardest to keep our feet nice and warm. Still, the chill of winter wind sends a shiver through the body every time a breeze blows by just the right way. Logically speaking, it makes sense to think that between our bodies constantly working to keep us warm in the winter months, that the body would obviously burn more calories in cold weather – right?

Not exactly, but kind of.

Cold weather is not the sole deciding factor dictating whether or not our bodies go into calorie-burning mode. It’s more so the process our bodies undergo once we start shivering from a temperature drop. This process is called thermogenesis. One way of this happening is to shiver, which is when the muscles contract involuntarily in order to create warmth and help maintain a healthy body temperature.

Or, your body could go into non-shivering thermogenesis. This is where the body’s brown fat breaks down to release heat and, again, help warm the body up. Both shivering and non-shivering thermogenesis increase the body’s energy expenditure, which helps burn calories. This is why your body may burn more calories in colder weather.

However, those two energy-expending and calorie-burning processes only kick into high gear when the body is truly cold. Once exercise begins, and the body naturally warms up from it, the body isn’t going to burn any extra calories just because of the weather. But don’t use that as an excuse to not exercise this winter season, sitting around and being sedentary is no way to keep the body healthy during the chilly months.

The Caloric Burn Breakdown

  1. BMR: Your basic daily caloric burn, known as BMR, or basal metabolic rate. That’s how many calories your body needs just to function at rest. (~60% – ~80% total energy expenditure)
  2. FOOD BREAKDOWN: The energy needed to break down all that yummy food consumed throughout the day. (~10% total energy expenditure)
  3. EXERCISING: Lastly, the energy needed when engaging in physical activity. (~10% – ~30% total energy expenditure)

The calories burned during thermogenesis plays a substantially small role in overall expenditure, less than 5% – 10% actually.1 In one study where individuals were put in cold rooms for an entire day, subjects burned an additional 150 to 200 calories.2 That’s not ideal or healthy, and not a smart way to burn extra calories.

So, if you’re looking to burn extra calories this winter season, then up your fitness routine rather than your time freezing in the cold. And for those of you looking to take your workout season indoors, get a 5-day LA Fitness guest pass here.

Sources:

  1. Belluz, Julia. “Do You Burn More Calories Exercising in the Cold? Here’s What the Science Says.” Vox, Vox, 6 Feb. 2018, www.vox.com/2017/12/23/16774320/exercise-in-cold-burn-more-calories.
  2. Ibid

Resources:

  1. Praderio, Caroline. “If Your Office Is Freezing This Summer, You Might Be Burning Extra Calories.” INSIDER, INSIDER, 3 July 2018, www.thisisinsider.com/does-being-cold-burn-calories-2017-8.

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