The Heart: Love, Fitness and Heartbreak – Podcast Ep. 18

The Heart: Love, Fitness and Heartbreak – Podcast Ep. 18


Welcome to the 18th episode of the Living Healthy podcast, presented by LA Fitness.

Can you really die of a broken heart? We asked Subbarao Myla, Medical Director at the HOAG Cardiovascular Institute, this exact same question and the answer might surprise you. Listen to our special “Healthy Heart” episode now on the Living Healthy Podcast!

If you have questions, you can either send us an email to blog@lafitness.com or you can shout it at us on social media using the hashtag #livinghealthypodcast. Both ways work and we check our inbox weekly!

This podcast should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Timecard Markers – The Heart: Love, Fitness and Heartbreak – Podcast Ep. 18

***The Physical Side of the Heart – Part 1*** 

Introduction   

0:01   

Introduction of Subbarao Myla, Medical Director at the HOAG Cardiovascular Institute

Begins at 0:55 

What Makes the Heart So Special? 

Begins at 1:41   

What is Heart Disease Exactly? 

Begins at 2:55  

What Causes the Beginning Breakdown of the Heart? 

Begins at 4:28 

What Type of Exercise is Best for the Heart? 

Begins 5:38 

Why Do People’s Heartrates Vary So Greatly?  

Begins at 7:37 

Subtle Warning Signs of the Heart 

Begins at 9:55 

High Blood Pressure vs. High Heart Rate – Which is Worse? 

Begins at 13:53 

***The Spiritual Side of the Heart – Part 2***  

Does Love Actually, Truly, Affect the Heart? 

Begins at 16:02 

Can You Really Die of a Broken Heart?  

Begins at 19:46 

Can You Fix a Broken Heart? How Long Does It Take to Fix a Broken Heart? 

Begins at 22:49  

Teenagers and Cell Phone Use: Predicting Depressive Tendencies  

Begins at 25:00 

How to Make Your Heart Feel Happier 

Begins at 26:04 

The Elderly and Loneliness 

Begins at 28:05 

***The Nutritional Side of the Heart – Part 3*** 

Heart Healthy Foods 

Begins at 30:46 

Eat Brighter Foods? Here’s Why 

Begins at 33:43 

Portion Control – How Much to Cut Out 

Begins at 34:04 

How Much Dark Chocolate is Healthy for You   

Begins at 36:43  

Actionable Advice 

Begins at 38:12  

Outro 

Begins at 40:32 


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Help with Carb Intake Needed

Help with Carb Intake Needed

Question:

I need help with my carbs, please. I only allow 45 gm of carbs at each meal.

– Laura B.

Answer:

You are in company with other people who may need to count carbohydrates, often for blood sugar management. The focus would be on low glycemic choices. For a limit of 45 grams carbohydrate per meal you could roughly plan on 25 gm from grain/starch, 10 gm from fruit or milk, and 10 gm from non-starchy vegetables. Remember that use of certain condiments will necessitate corresponding reduction from your food total.

Here’s one example providing approx. 45 gm carbohydrate meals:

  • Breakfast: 8 oz. plain Greek yogurt, ¾ C raspberries, 1 medium white potato and ½ C peppers & onion as potatoes O’Brien (Tbsp oil)
  • Lunch: ½ C rice pilaf, fish fillet, 2 Tbsp tartar sauce, 1 pineapple ring, 1 C green beans
  • Dinner: 5” corn cob, 1 C broccoli, grilled chicken, grilled peach half, 6 fl. oz. milk

Analysis on www.FitDay.com by a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist = 135 gm total carbohydrate (42 breakfast, 47 lunch, 42 dinner) in 1850 calories. Findings were used along with RDN’s professional judgment.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

7 + 14 =


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What is ALS and Could It Affect You?

What is ALS and Could It Affect You?

When you think fitness, what comes to mind? Toned muscles, flat abs, strong and trendy fitness influencers? Chances are that your mind doesn’t think of progressive muscle weakness, but that’s exactly what former fitness industry leader Augie Nieto experienced when he was diagnosed with the crippling disease ALS (Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis), otherwise referred to as Lou Gehrig’s disease.

Photographed: Lynne and Augie 

Photographed: Matt Bellina and Team

But what is ALS and who does ALS affect?  

“ALS is a disorder that affects the function of nerves and muscles”1. One of the mysterious things about this disease is that researchers don’t yet know what causes it, but they do have some insight on those most heavily afflicted by the disease.

Per the ALS Association, Massachusetts Chapter –

Most people who develop ALS are between the ages of 40 and 70, with an average age of 55 at the time of diagnosis. However, cases of the disease do occur in persons in their twenties and thirties. Generally, ALS occurs in greater percentages as men and women grow older. ALS is 20% more common in men than in women. However, with increasing age, the incidence of ALS is more equal between men and women.2

While an exact cause has not yet been discovered, “it is known […] that military veterans, particularly those deployed during the Gulf War, are approximately twice as likely to develop ALS.”3

One fortunate thing about this disease is that it is not contagious. However, that doesn’t help ease the minds of friends and families whose loved ones struggle with this deliberating condition.

Fifteen new cases are recorded each day4, estimating that as many as 20,000 Americans have the disease at any given time. The onset of ALS symptoms can be as common as muscle weakness or stiffness. Once the disease progresses, however, “vital functions such as speech, swallowing and later breathing”5 are lost.

There is currently no cure for ALS.

In 1995, the FDA approved a drug known as Riluzole. This drug has scientifically shown “to prolong the life of persons with ALS by at least a few months.”6

Each year, LA Fitness partners with Augie’s Quest, founded by Life Fitness leader, Augie Nieto. His foundation raises money to help fund ALS research. It’s his mission to one day find a cure for this horrible disease.

If you would like to learn more about how you can donate, please visit www.lafitnesscares.com.

For more information on ALS, click here and here.

Photographed: Collin Hadley and family 

Photographed: Andrea Lytle Peet 

Sources:

  1. “Who Gets ALS?” org, webma.alsa.org/site/PageServer/?pagename=MA_1_WhoGets.html.
  2. Ibid
  3. Ibid
  4. Ibid
  5. Ibid
  6. Ibid

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The Best Foods to Consume Pre-Resistance Training

The Best Foods to Consume Pre-Resistance Training

Question:

What are the best foods to consume pre-resistance training?

– Steve S.

Answer:

Since resistance exercise is largely an anaerobic activity, you will burn mostly carbohydrates for energy during your training bout. ‘Ready’ carbohydrates will fuel you and prime your muscles’ insulin pump to prepare for protein synthesis with your recovery meal. Choose low fat, low fiber carbohydrates such as pasta, white rice, pretzels, non-grainy crackers, most cereals, bread, skinless sweet potato, cooked carrots, tomatoes, bananas, melons, strawberries, oranges, and unsweetened applesauce.

You’ll want to incorporate easily digestible protein such as egg whites, skinless chicken/turkey breast, deli-sliced lean meat, tuna, tofu, casein, and soy or whey protein concentrate. If you have a sensitive stomach you might consider peptides (partially broken-down proteins) considered more bio-available, but they are not beneficial for most people. A branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) enriched protein powder could benefit, as BCAAs may preserve muscle glycogen stores and reduce the amount of protein breakdown.

Four examples of pre-training mini-meals are:

  1. rice or oat square cereal, non-fat milk, strawberries
  2. noodles & chunky marinara, turkey meatball
  3. ½ steamed sweet potato, chicken tenderloin
  4. banana, graham crackers, hard-cooked egg whites

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

14 + 10 =


Recommended Reading - Q+A

Member Spotlight | Devin Ryan: My Journey in Fitness

Member Spotlight | Devin Ryan: My Journey in Fitness

Fitness was indoctrinated very early on in my life. Healthy competition and athleticism began with seasons of tee-ball, basketball summer camps, and track and field in high school, supplemented by dance on the offseason. With a buzzing household of four active boys and my bountiful curious female presence, my parents always encouraged us to “go outside and play.” My household was never not moving!

My earliest (and perhaps fondest) memory of fitness was watching my mother every day after school. She hastily preheated the oven before going to her bedroom as she got us settled into our school work. There, she removed her tailored office clothes, kicked off her favorite black patent-leather “cockroach-killer” heels and traded them for one of my dad’s t-shirts and her favorite spandex biker shorts. With her work files piled high on the kitchen counter, she threw some pasta sauce on the stove with a heaping amount of fresh and dry herbs simmering over low heat for that evening’s dinner. At exactly 3:30 pm every afternoon, she popped in her early 90s aerobics VHS tape and jumped right into her enthusiastic stepping. I marveled at the overly-animated, permed out fitness instructor sporting spandex and white ankle socks motivating my super-hero of a mom to “go for another 30 seconds more” as she panted between incoming house calls and me racing my sibling’s toy-cars by her feet.

This image of my multi-faceted mother trying to balance work, family, and self-care is forever engraved in my mind. I understand now why it was necessary for my mother to commit to fitness. To my mother, fitness was loving herself and caring about how she felt regardless of the external demands life asked of her to fulfill. To this day, I credit my mother for not only being an example for healthy living but continuing it as a practice today. She was, after all, the person I went to get a gym membership with. We worked out together, supported each other, and reminded one another (while thrift shopping) that the number on the tag of that dress is not as important as the way you feel in it.


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