Fast Food and Your Body – Podcast Ep. 20

Fast Food and Your Body – Podcast Ep. 20


Welcome to the 20th episode of the Living Healthy Podcast, presented by LA Fitness.

On this episode of Living Healthy, we bring back a favorite to the show, LA Fitness registered dietitian, Debbie James! We talk all about one of everyone’s guilty pleasures, fast food. It’s not a surprise to anyone that fast food is unhealthy, but yet so many still indulge in it! Why is this? What makes fast food so addictive? And is there a way to detox from it without putting your body into shock?

We answer all of these questions (and more), along with announcing the winner of our first-ever #LHP giveaway!

Stick around to the end of the episode for some truly horrible “whooshing” sound effects from Andrew and myself. We love making this content for you all and we hope you enjoy it!

Email us or hit us up on social media using the hashtag #LivingHealthyPodcast. Share what you love about us and you may get a shoutout on a future episode! 

How Are We Doing? 


This podcast should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.


Timecard Markers – Fast Food and Your Body – Podcast Ep. 20

Intro

Begins at 0:01

LA Fitness Registered Dietitian, Debbie James, joins the show

Begins at 0:36

What is Considered “Fast Food”? 

0:44

What is it Exactly About Fast Food That Makes It Unhealthy?

1:19

Why Are Fast Foods So Overly Processed?

2:14

Deli Meats vs. Packaged Meats vs. Fresh Carved – What’s Healthiest?

3:16

Flavor Enhancers and How They Influence Taste Buds

4:17

QUICK BREAK – LHP GIVEAWAY CONTEST WINNER ANNOUNCEMENT

6:22

Healthy Fast Food Options

7:01

How Does Fast Food Affect the Body and Internal Organs?

8:42

Can You Reverse the Damage Done to Your Body from Fast Food?

11:00

Can a Fast Food Detox Shock the Body?

12:13

Fast Food Fruit Smoothies – Healthy?

14:07

Is Fast Food Addictive?

16:30

Quick and Healthy Alternatives

19:44

Don’t Burst My Bubble, Debbie! Is Diet Soda Healthy?

20:37

Actionable Advice

22:20

Outro

23:40


Recommended Podcast Episodes 

Plateau on the Paleo Diet

Plateau on the Paleo Diet

Question:

I’m hoping to get dietary advice for fat loss. I’m currently eating a Paleo diet with a smoothie for breakfast and salads with protein and maybe a sweet potato for lunch and dinner with no added sugar and plenty of healthy fats. This type of diet used to yield results for me, but now my weight and body fat percentage seem to stay the same no matter what I do. Any advice is much appreciated.

– Heather C.

Answer:

When a successful diet approach no longer works, there might be a few possibilities as to why. Depending on how long ago your last attempt was, the age-related effects on metabolism could be slowing things down. You could be close to your ideal body weight range, so your body may be trying to hold onto its fat. It could be that while you’re adhering to the same restrictions, your portions or between-meal snacking have crept up. Also, your activity level and lifestyle may not be as they were when you got results in the past.

A person can still be micronutrient-deficient in areas on any diet1, especially if your day-to-day meal plan is repetitive. One of the pitfalls to a Paleo diet could be iodine deficiency2 which can affect metabolism (via the thyroid gland). To avoid undernutrition, rely on whole foods not packaged Paleo foods, double vegetable intake beyond salad (like calcium sources: kale, spinach, cauliflower, broccoli, collard greens, Brussel sprouts), incorporate eggs and mushrooms for vitamin D, and vary your intake daily.

You may be surprised that when you’re meeting your full nutritional needs with adequate sleep and exercise, your body responds with easier weight loss!

References:

  1. Prevalence of micronutrient deficiency in popular diet plans. JB Calton. Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 2010 June 10: 7:24.
  2. A Paleolithic-type diet results in iodine deficiency: a 2-year randomized trial in postmenopausal obese women. S Manousou et al. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2018. 72, 124-129.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

4 + 15 =


Recommended Reading - Q+A

Foods for Weight Loss

Foods for Weight Loss

Question:

I am wondering what you recommend for a diet to lose 10 lbs. in 2 weeks when I work out every day on the elliptical for 1 hr. I know I should do calorie counting, but I was hoping to adjust my diet to eat foods that promote weight loss.

– Lou G.

Answer:

Calorie counting is a good start IF you know what your estimated energy needs are and how much you were eating before. Of course, you can just choose an arbitrary number or follow generic advice, often a flat 1,500 calories daily. However, that method isn’t an accurate guide as to how much you can lose. Losing 10 pounds in two weeks means you’re sure to decrease lean body mass as well, so I don’t recommend it. The most effective weight loss is fat loss, which doesn’t occur as rapidly as you intend. Keeping off those pounds means changing your lifestyle permanently. 

Foods that promote weight loss are rich in micronutrients, low in saturated fat and full of phytochemicals and fiber. Vegetables are perfect! You can work some sort of veggie into every meal and snack. Whole grains (e.g., barley, rye, wheat berries, quinoa) give you sufficient energy for your daily elliptical workout. Lean proteins (e.g., most fish, egg whites, poultry breast, extra lean meats) will support muscle retention as you curb caloric intake. Water is critical for efficient metabolism and to help dampen appetite. Fruits are a great substitute for desserts and work as ready-to-eat snacks pre/post workout. Even something higher calorie like nuts can work into your diet given you control portions – an ounce per serving. 

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

9 + 10 =


Recommended Reading - Q+A

Bulking During High-Intensity Bike Training

Bulking During High-Intensity Bike Training

Question:

How do I build bulk while maintaining high-intensity biking exercise? Can this goal of mine be assisted with better nutrition/eating habits on my part?

– Bowie B.

Answer:

Building bulk will largely come from resistance training to promote muscle adaptation (growth) to meet a higher workload. Interval sessions are great to boost power and promote weight loss. The two are not mutually exclusive. Speak with a Pro Results® trainer for how to incorporate strength training around your cycling.

Better nutrition can only help! Support your exercise of either type with adequate pre-workout snacks and recovery nutrition. Your goal is to build muscle and preventing any catabolism will contribute to your net positive. Fuel up beforehand with a small snack (e.g. a piece of fruit or handful of crackers) if your meal was recent, and larger snack (e.g. yogurt/granola plus berries, or ½ sandwich) if it’s been a couple of hours since your last meal. Replace depleted energy stores within 30 minutes following an hour-long workout by consuming about 30-50 grams of carbohydrates. Add protein (about 10-20 grams) to prevent breakdown and enhance muscle repair.

Practice good eating habits the rest of your day to keep your metabolism ready for your next cycling or bulk-building workout.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

2 + 15 =


Recommended Reading - Q+A

Rib Eye Steak and Zoodles from Sealegs Wine Bar

Rib Eye Steak and Zoodles from Sealegs Wine Bar

“A well-balanced meal constitutes healthy cooking. I believe in ‘everything in moderation’, eating from the full spectrum of food and limiting the rich and indulgent ingredients. You can obtain great flavor from vegetables alone, and if you cook from the heart, that might be the healthiest ingredient of all.”

Chef Paul Vazquez

Executive Chef, SeaLegs Wine Bar


SeaLegs Wine Bar is located at 21022 Beach Blvd. #105, Huntington Beach, CA 92648. Open Monday through Friday from 4pm to 10:30pm, Saturday from 10am to 11:30pm, and Sunday from 10am to 3pm. For the menu and additional details, please visit http://www.sealegswinebar.com/.


Rib Eye Steak and Zoodles from Sealegs Wine Bar

Photo Credit: Candace Rock 

Ingredients

For the Dish

  • 14 oz. ribeye, off the bone, cubed
  • 2 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 2 medium zucchini, spiralized
  • 1 Tablespoon blended olive oil
  • 1 Teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 Teaspoon minced shallot
  • ¼ to ½ cup cherry tomatoes, halved (adjust to your preference)
  • ¼ cup white wine
  • ½ cup veggie stock
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • minced parsley to garnish
  • parmesan cheese (optional)

For the Steak Marinade

  • 1 cup soy sauce
  • 1 cup rice wine vinegar
  • ½ cup mirin
  • ½ cup olive oil
  • 1 jalapeno, deseeded
  • 2 tablespoons grated ginger
  • ½ bunch cilantro

Method

Step 1:

  • Take all ingredients for the marinade and blend them together.
  • Cube up the steak and place in marinade for at least 30 minutes.
  • Prepare veggies while meat marinates (spiralize zucchini, halve cherry tomatoes, mince garlic and shallot).
  • Remove meat from marinade, season with salt and pepper.
  • In a hot cast iron pan, sear steak cubes until browned on all sides.
  • Finish with 1 tablespoon butter to coat steaks, remove from heat and rest while cooking zoodles.

Step 2:

  • In a hot pan, begin to sauté garlic and shallot in oil until fragrant.
  • Add tomatoes and continue to sauté.
  • Add zucchini noodles and sauté until al dente.
  • Deglaze pan with white wine until it evaporates.
  • Lower the heat, add the veggie stock.
  • Cook zoodles until tender.
  • Season with salt and pepper.

Step 3: 

  • Serve in large bowl, putting zoodles off to one side, leaving room for the steak.
  • Sprinkle minced parsley over zucchini and sea salt over the steak cubes for added flavor.
  • (Additionally, you can also sprinkle grated parmesan cheese over the zoodles).

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