Raw Vegan Fasting

Raw Vegan Fasting

Question:

I am a raw vegan. I don’t eat any processed foods such as bread, pasta, crackers, etc. I also cook my food at a certain temperature (not over 120 degrees). I fast (for religious reasons) very frequently. Currently, I am fasting from 8am-8pm for the next two weeks. Goals: To lose weight. Maintain a consistent diet whether I’m on a fast or not.

– Cassandra D.

Answer:

Hi Cassandra, if you’ve been following your raw vegan lifestyle and practicing fasting for some time, I’ll admit you have one up on me! I am no stranger to helping someone plan a nutritionally adequate raw vegan diet, but your situation is intriguing since you also want to lose weight while maintaining consistency around fasts.

It seems to me that achieving consistency, fasting or not, necessitates consuming the same volume of food daily/weekly but in the acceptable time parameters. Eating everything one would normally during the day but doing so before 8am and after 8 pm means two bigger meals. Certainly attainable if you really need to avoid the weight fluctuations that typically accompany fasting. Better that than overnight or end-of-fast binges that overcompensate for what’s missed!

We don’t provide personalized diet plans here, sorry. In addition, I would need to meet with someone one-on-one for individualized meal planning with the appropriate combinations and portions for her nutritional needs. A search at www.eatright.org/find-an-expert can locate an available Registered Dietitian Nutritionist specializing in vegetarian nutrition, although you may have to dig a bit deeper to find one that can help with your situation. Overall stick to the foods you’re comfortable with which I hope include a lot of leafy greens, sprouts, soaked grains, sprouted legumes, nuts/seeds, vegetables, and fruit, plus avocado, coconut, fermented foods, and cold-pressed oils. Of course, drinking a sufficient amount of permitted beverages during daylight hours while fasting is a must.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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Meal Timing for Type 1 Diabetics

Meal Timing for Type 1 Diabetics

Question:

I’m a type 1 diabetic. I need to work on my stomach. Should I eat a meal before attempting this or wait till I finish then eat my meal?

– rgates2940

Answer:

I will have to rely on the famous phrase, “It depends.” When you’ve eaten last, what you ate, your last insulin dose and type, your current blood glucose level, and the expected walk/gym exercise intensity and duration will all dictate the best timing of your meal. Adding exercise to an otherwise presently stable day will draw energy, increase insulin sensitivity and promote blood sugar uptake into cells. Because diabetes mellitus type 1 responses to exercise include blood sugar lows, you should take proper precautions and be prepared to treat hypoglycemia.

Start recording your blood sugars before, during and after exercise so that you can better predict when you need a snack. Share your record with your endocrinologist (or healthcare professional) whose guidance regarding blood sugar management you should follow. You can also receive personalized medical nutrition therapy from a Dietitian who’s also a Certified Diabetes Educator for the exact volume and timing of your pre/post workout meals.

Sources:

    1. http://www.diabetes.org/food-and-fitness/fitness/exercise-and-type-1-diabetes.html
    2. https://www.jdrf.org/blog/2013/02/21/dont-sweat-it-exercise-and-type-1-diabetes/

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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Snacks to Help Boost Energy

Snacks to Help Boost Energy

Question:

I’m a snacker, consistently snacking throughout the day. What are some snacks that would help boost my energy and that are actually good for me?

– Anjelica V.

Answer:

Snacking and grazing are suitable ways to consume your daily intake, providing the choices are good ones and you compensate with smaller meals. I’d suggest snacks in the 100-200 calorie range based on whole foods, with an occasional small energy/protein bar as backup. Good energy-boosting snack choices are:

  • hummus, whole wheat pita bread, carrots
  • hard cooked egg topped chopped salad in a jar
  • tuna, whole grain crackers, celery
  • a cup of hearty soup (less than 10 g fat, at least 5 g protein)
  • edamame
  • high fiber cereal, milk, kiwi
  • plain Greek yogurt, berries, coconut flakes
  • chia seed pudding, hazelnuts, dark chocolate shavings
  • pizza roll: string cheese, wheat tortilla, spoonful marinara
  • cinnamon popcorn, dried apples, and pecans
  • crisp pear and peanut butter
  • banana and almond butter
  • watermelon, cucumber, feta cheese & mint skewers
  • energy/protein bar (at least 8 g protein, total sugar less than half total carbohydrate)

Leftovers of any balanced meal can serve as a good snack, too! Remember to keep portions in check and keep your total day’s intake in mind for variety and nutrient adequacy.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

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Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

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What’s the DASH Diet?

What’s the DASH Diet?

Question:

I am a male, 46 years old, 192 lbs., 5 11″. I exercise regularly and I’m looking for a healthy diet to help keep in good shape and keep my cholesterol, sugar levels, blood pressure, and other levels in check. What would you recommend for me?

– Jorge M.

Answer:

Great job exercising daily and being proactive to keep chronic disease markers in check! A Mediterranean or DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) eating plan seems suitable for your goals. Really, a blend of these is ideal.

The Mediterranean style diet emphasizes whole grains, fruits, vegetables, beans, herbs, spices, nuts, and healthy fats as core foods. Fish and seafood are eaten twice weekly while dairy foods, eggs, and poultry are eaten moderate portions. Red meat and sweets are rarely eaten.

The American Heart Association’s DASH diet focuses on fruits, vegetables, whole grains, poultry, fish, nuts, legumes, and low-fat dairy to provide potassium, calcium, and magnesium. It is high in fiber, moderate in sodium, and low in fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, and sugar with little red meat. See table below.

LA Fitness, LA Fitness Living Healthy, Living Healthy, Ask Our Dietitian, nutrition, nutritional advice, healthy diets, best diet, diet plans, DASH diet

Your anthropometrics and activity level suggests an estimated daily energy need of 2,700 calories. Combining the two plans, you should base meals on a foundation of vegetables, legumes, whole grains, fruit, and nuts. Fish, seafood, low-fat dairy and healthy plant fats (e.g. olive oil, avocado) should round-out your diet. Also, spread your food intake throughout the day to support energy levels, proper digestion, and metabolism.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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What to Eat for a 6-Pack

What to Eat for a 6-Pack

Question:

I am in the process of cutting down my body fat, but nothing seems to work. My metabolism is not very good, but I’m doing cardio 3 times a week. I also not eating as many calories to cut down. What and how many times should I eat if I want a six-pack?

– Arib C.

Answer:

First and foremost, I hope you’re incorporating some resistance training into your workout routine! Cardio is great for reducing body fat around the belly, but six-pack abs are made from strength training to develop those abdominal muscles. See a ProResults® trainer for assistance and listen to one’s advice for best ab machines on our Ask a Trainer series.

That said, you should eat three to six times per day, schedule and appetite permitting. If you choose to eat more frequent meals and snacks, pay attention to portions so you’re redistributing the calories you eat, not adding more. Meals and snacks should be based on vegetables – lots of them!, lean protein, and complex carbohydrates with fresh fruit and low-fat dairy to complement. Avoiding alcohol and added sugars is essential if you aren’t getting results.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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