Metabolism Advice for Those Over 50+

Metabolism Advice for Those Over 50+

Question:

I am a member at LA Fitness in San Antonio Texas, just signed up! Ever since I turned 50 I have been gaining weight with the same diet. I don’t drink sodas and I eat at home most of the time; lean poultry, tilapia, quinoa and sometimes rice. I try not to add too much salt to food. I have a busy life and I don’t have time to cook complicated meals or eat 8 times a day. Even though I hardly eat bread, I do like corn tortillas. Obviously, my metabolism has slowed down. 

– Rosa T.

Answer:

Sounds like the “same diet” you’ve followed isn’t working for you now. From what you describe, the lean protein and plain grains are okay if the volume is appropriate. Check your portions as you should target 3-4 oz. poultry/fish and ½-1 C quinoa/rice (or 2-3 corn tortillas) per meal. Look at all the other foods that make up your diet and compare to recommended serving sizes.

Consider filling up on fruits and vegetables which provide bulk with fewer calories. Great that you avoid soda, but make sure other beverages aren’t loaded with sugar either – particularly coffee drinks or juices/smoothies. Regarding your metabolism, remember that reductions in activity and lean body mass are usually to blame. Use your new membership by getting in both calorie-burning aerobic exercise and muscle-retaining strength workouts.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

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Advice from an RDN on How to Gain Healthy Weight

Advice from an RDN on How to Gain Healthy Weight

Question:

My name is Patrick. I am a new member to the gym since in January. Since joining, I go 4 times a week (Monday – Thursday) and want to optimize my results. I work out for about an hour and fifteen minutes each time, mostly focusing on the upper body and abdomen. I drink a protein shake every day and try to also eat an avocado. I have trouble it seems gaining weight even though I’m consuming 2,500+ calories a day usually. I also drink a Gatorade every time I go to the gym and try to eat a lot of nuts with my turkey at every meal. I don’t have a lot of time to prep food so like buying pre-packaged cold turkey. I can eat straight out of the package or pre-packed snack mixes of dried fruit and nuts. I have gained about 10 pounds in the last 5 months, but results are slow to come. I do the same workout every time hitting nearly every muscle group in my body sometime during my workout. What are the best workouts/machines to use for upper bodybuilding and what should I be eating?

– Patrick

Answer:

Ten pounds gained is a testament to your efforts thus far! Based on the loose description of your intake it sounds like you’re getting dense foods like nuts, dried fruit, and avocado in. You say you drink 500 calories worth and I’ll assume that is from the two beverages you’ve mentioned – a protein shake and Gatorade. Not bad. Hopefully, you are drinking other fluids! Make sure they also have calories like milk (alternatives) and juice.

For solid foods – even quick/packaged items – maximize every bite by making sure it’s topped, soaked or loaded with condiments. For instance, make instant oatmeal with milk instead of water and use extra mayo packets on a turkey sandwich or wrap. High-calorie ready to eat food includes cheese cubes, full-fat sweetened yogurt, potato salad, bars suitable for hiking, and shelf-stable meal pouches (though they may taste better heated).

Not fixing your own food is a disadvantage to healthier eating, as most other energy-rich items are loaded with sugar, salt and fat or contain few fruits and vegetables: canned chili, fried chips, fruit strips/leather, jerky, burritos, egg rolls, etc. Try to take time the night before to pack a small cooler of a few healthier staples. For example, hard-cooked eggs or a single-serve peanut butter tub with a bagel, raw apples or celery sticks as snacks.

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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Is There a Bad Time to Eat Fruit?

Is There a Bad Time to Eat Fruit?

Question:

I am trying to lose weight but have had no luck. I’m 44 years old. I’m somewhat athletic but have serious knee issues. I weigh 197 lbs., trying to get to 180 lbs. My question is: Is there a bad time to eat fruit? Is late in the day not a good idea? I like fruit as a snack, but I’ve heard that late in the day is not a good idea.

– Andy M.

Answer:

In twenty years as a dietitian, I rarely see an excess of raw fruit be the culprit in someone’s weight gain. The 10-20 grams of fructose bound with water and fiber from a serving of fruit isn’t a concern. It’s the other sources of fructose (sodas, sweetened teas, bakery desserts) that have added sugars which will prevent you from losing weight since they are usually excess calories.

Eating fruit in the evening as an alternative to higher calorie and fat desserts is ideal. As a snack, a 16 oz fruit smoothie is probably best earlier in the day – unless you’re using it as a recovery drink from a heavy afternoon workout. A plain apple with a few nuts or hard-cooked egg makes a great between meal snack!

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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The Plant-Based Diet: What You Need to Know – Podcast Ep. 27

The Plant-Based Diet: What You Need to Know – Podcast Ep. 27


Welcome to the 27th episode of the Living Healthy Podcast, presented by LA Fitness.

On this episode of the Living Healthy Podcast, we’re discussing what a plant-based diet is, how it differs from a vegetarian diet, and whether or not you should try it!

How Are We Doing? 


This podcast should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.


Timecard Markers – PlantBased Diets – Podcast Ep. 27   

Intro    

Begins at 0:01     

Introduction of LAF Registered Dietitian, Debbie James 

0:38 

What is The Plant-Based Diet? 

1:04 

Is it Different from Following a Vegetarian or Vegan Diet? 

1:53 

Is There a Healthier Meat You Should Lean Towards Eating When Following This Plan? 

2:22 

How Often Should You Include Meat in a Plant-Based Eating Plan? 

2:45   

What Are the Benefits of Following a Plant-Based Eating Style? 

4:09 

Should All the Veggies You Eat Be Organic? 

5:19 

Where Do Potatoes Fall into This? 

6:11 

Is the Plant-Based Diet for Everyone? Can Everyone Benefit from Following This Style of Eating? 

7:15 

Do You Have to Eat More Frequently? 

8:05 

Some Plant-Based Meal Suggestions 

8:46 

Plant-Based Meats – Are These Healthy Options? 

10:36 

Would Someone Following a Plant-Based Eating Style Have to Supplement? 

14:57 

When Can You Go for More Information? 

18:42 

Actionable Advice 

20:23 

Outro 

21:10 


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An RDN’s Advice on Isolate Protein and Monohydrate Creatine

An RDN’s Advice on Isolate Protein and Monohydrate Creatine

Question:

Hi, I’m a member of LA Fitness. I’ve been working out for a few years and I’m in very good shape. I’m 37 years old, 5’8″, 142 pounds, and cut. I don’t want to put on more weight or look bulky but want bigger muscles. I have 2 questions: 1) Do I need to change isolate protein every once in a while, as the body may get used to the same brand? 2) Do you recommend taking monohydrate creatine? I don’t know if I should take creatine, please comment. Thanks.

– Mo L.

Answer:

Hi Mo, here are your answers!

1) If it’s not in combination with vitamins/minerals or other compounds, then it isn’t necessary to cycle the brand of isolate protein supplement. It’s not like you build up a tolerance to peptides. If you’re consuming the same isolate day in and day out, then I’d say to switch it up with REAL FOOD protein to provide amino acid and nutrient variety as well as solids to digest. Protein supplements are great for convenience and to save time but shouldn’t be relied upon for the basics, like meeting daily needs.

2) If someone is already following excellent workout and dietary plans to support muscle growth but wants more results, then creatine supplementation may be an intervention to try. Although your body makes some, additional creatine is useful for increasing creatine phosphate reserves to improve exercise performance and strength during heavy resistance training. Creatine monohydrate is the form most studied and shown to be safe and effective at 0.1 g creatine/kg of body weight. (Protocols for loading dose and maintenance vary.)

– Debbie J., MS, RD

This article should not replace any exercise program or restrictions, any dietary supplements or restrictions, or any other medical recommendations from your primary care physician. Before starting any exercise program or diet, make sure it is approved by your doctor.

Some questions have been edited for length and/or clarity.

Ask our Dietitian

Have a nutrition question? Our registered dietitian is ready to help!

Email nutrition@lafitness.com or submit your question below and it may be featured in an upcoming article!

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